Lawyers of Los Angeles

New Book Digs Deep Into the Dramatic History of the Lawyers of the L.A. Bar Association and Some of the Cases that Shaped Jurisprudence

Kathleen Tuttle has written an historical history of the Lawyers of the Los Angeles Bar Association. It is not a dry history of certain lawyers, but a dynamic look at many of the court cases that shaped our history and culture. She dug through old oral histories and found the answers as to why certain law firms, judges, and lawyers got involved with some of the biggest cases in Los Angeles local history. A great read and a book packed with local history.  Click below to watch the video Interview of Kathleen Tuttle. She is interviewed by Judge Marc Marmaro (ret). here in Los Angeles, Sunday August 15, 2021.

The book is available at Chevalier’s Book Store in Los Angeles.

Click Here To Order Book From Chevalier's Books

 

Dan Glickman: Laughing At Myself

New Book Presents Highlights From a Career in Government and Industrry

Mr. Glickman appeared at Los Angeles Book Shop Chevalier’s Books on Larchmont on June 21st.  He was in conversation with Daniel Weiss and spoke about his lengthy career.  Click below to hear his talk – this is an audio recording with a few photos. Mr. Glickman and Mr. Weiss were introduced by Book Store owner Bert Deixler.  The store recently moved into a beautiful location on the west side of Larchmont, a village-like shopping area teaming with shoppers.

Chevalier’s Books, 133 S. Larchmont, Los Angeles.

Dan Glickman

Dan Glickman in conversation with Daniel Weiss

 

 

Latest News From Iliad Bookshop, North Hollywood

Here’s the latest from Iliad Book Shop, the good news is that they are open!  Visit them soon to support this great bookshop.

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Hi Gang!

California’s rollercoaster pandemic ride continues… As of this last week of January, we are allowed to go from maximum capacity of 20% to 25%, meaning that we’ll be able to allow up to 25 customers in the store at a time. As always, please be aware that if we reach capacity (almost a certainty on Saturdays), we will have to ask you to wait outside. Also, as a reminder: you must wear a face covering/mask, practice six-foot social distancing in the store, and please stay home if you have any symptoms of or have been recently exposed to Covid. We have hand sanitizer and gloves available for your shopping security. Sorry, but the bathroom is not available to customers.

Sorry to say that we don’t have new dates yet on when we will resume buying/taking books for credit. If you’d like to donate books, we can give you a hand unloading once you’re in our rear parking lot.

We are making progress on our new Rare Book Room, which will be located adjacent to the main sales counter. Take a look at the photo just below, and you’ll see our dry-walling and painting is now done. Next up: new bookcases to hold those 300 boxes of rarities!

We feel hopeful about 2021, although it’s likely going to be late summer or fall before things start to right themselves again. In the meantime, please stay safe and healthy

 

Dan, Lisa, Poul, and Brett (and Zeus and Apollo)
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Old Book Cart in Florence, Italy

Los Angeles Could Use a Few of These

by Paul Hunt

This Photo taken by Bookseller Arnold Herr:  He writes: >>  I looked through Bookstore Memories the other evening and saw your article on book carts in Europe and your request for other pictures.  Here’s one I took in May 1987 in Florence, Italy.  It stood outside the Medici Palace and was just down the street from a penzione I was staying at while in town.  Feel free to use it.

Thanks much, Arnold, we love the book carts.  Pre-Pandemic (seems like a different lifetime) I was occasionally stopping by the Goodwill Outlet store near DTLA.  They had carts similar to the ones in London, basically just a giant drawer on wheels.  Most of the carts were full of clothing, a couple with other junk, and maybe 10 filled with books.  It was madness, the clerks would push out a cart and everyone would have to stand back about 3 feet.  Then the clerk would yell out “OK” or “Go for it”  and the mob would attack the cart, stuff flying everywhere.  The book scouts who were looking for textbooks were the worst, they would just fling  books around.  Many books were shredded by this insanity, spines broken, dust jackets torn.  Picture a pack of Jackals in Africa, plunging into a lame antelope, biting and snarling at one another, occasionally nipping off a piece of meat, the poor antelope giving a final cry and then dying of fear.  That was the Outlet store at its finest hour. Minor injuries were common. Yelling at jerks very common.

I did occasionally find a nice pamphlet or book, but it was not always worth the physical abuse and the evil thoughts of what the fate should be to the reckless bozos throwing textbooks at each other.  The price was right, 75 cents a pound.  Back in the good old days of the early 1970s I used to go to the warehouse of one of the Thrift chains and buy books and magazines by the pound.  Magazines were 10 cents a pound and books were 25 cents a pound, and there was a staggering amount to plow through every day.

So a couple weeks ago I stopped by the Outlet to check the book scene, it was open, although there was a line to get in, and masks were required.  I waited about a half an hour, which isn’t so bad because all the libraries are closed and many of the few remaining bookstores are shuttered.  I got in and there was only one cart with books, an abysmal selection of junk, I couldn’t even make a mercy buy.  So much for the good old days of book mayhem. Social distancing has put an end to the mob of vultures.  At least back then you could get a few things. The carts of literacy are just more victims of the declared pandemic. Our culture may not be far behind them, rolling toward oblivion on broken wheels.

The True Cost of Amazon

American Booksellers Association and Other Indie Studies Reveal Shocking Truth

The true cost of the U.S. Government’s continued lax attitude about the amazon.com monopoly has come to light in studies conducted by the American Booksellers Association and other independent groups.  Amazon has a virtual monopoly on the book business, both new and used.  They also have similar status in other industries, and despite raking in hundreds of millions of dollars from the Pentagon, Retail Sales, and C.I.A. purchase of “Cloud” space, they still didn’t pay a dime of income tax last year.

That’s right folks, a profit of 11.2 Billion Dollars and not a penny of income tax.  Worse, they got 129 million back as a refund for “tax credits”.  The year before they made 5.6 billion, and paid nothing.  Click here for details on Amazon Federal Taxes.

Here’s some more interesting facts from a recent One Year Period:

Amount of lost revenue to State and Local governments:  1.2 Billion Dollars.

The equivalent of 39,000 retail storefronts were displaced by amazon’s monopoly practices.

Estimated 220,000 retail jobs lost.

Click Here to read more details from the report from the ABA.

It is far past the time that the remaining independent and used book dealers get together and devise a strategy to fight the amazon monopoly.  It doesn’t look like the government is going to be of much help, they are too busy shoveling hundreds of millions to them for Defense Department items.

Faded Memories: Santa Barbara Bookstores in the 1980s

Santa Barbara Had A Respectable Batch of Wonderful Bookstores As Revealed in This Old Flyer in our Archives

Folding Guide to Santa Barbara Bookstores

Map Showed Location of Book Stores

I went over the list to try to determine who was left, who had moved, who was gone.  Here’s what I found:

Again Books:  The Phone is disconnected, I assume they are gone.

Andromeda Boookshop:  Closed in the early 1990s.

Avalon Books:  Now Avalon Comics and Games. Moved to 10 West Calle Laureles, S.B. 93105

The Book Den:  Still at the same location.

The Book Loft:  Moved to 1680 Mission Dr., Solvang, CA 93463.

Robert Gavora Bookseller:  Moved to P.O. Box 448, Talent, Oregon 97540.

Richard Gilbo Books. I believe Mr. Gilbo passed away some years ago.  He was a very good bookman.

Hammer Books:  Gone around 2013.  His collection, or parts of it are at UCSB.

Joseph The Provider Books:  Moved to 10 West Micheltorena, Santa Barbara 93101, 805-962-2141.

Kisch Book Shop:  Gone, could not find.

Lost Horizon Bookstore:  Moved to 539 San Ysidro Rd., Ste 4.  Santa Barbara 93108.

Maurice F. Neville Rare Books:  Great stock of books, Mr. Neville passed around 1987.

Paperback Alley Used Books:  Still at the same location.

Randall House:  Still at the same location.

Ted’s Used Books & Collectibles:  Gone around 2007.

I could not find any information on the following:  ABI Books, The Book Barn, Drew’s Book Shop, Merlin’s Bookshop, and Northwoods Books.  Does anyone have any information on any of these?  Let me know and I will update this list.

Paul Hunt.  unclepaulie@Rocketmail.com

How To Sell Books In Budapest

Get Yourself A Quaint Old Book Cart

They Still Read In Europe

Photo Copyright by Lance Webster.

It would be fun to have one in Westwood or the Third Street Prominade in Santa Monica, but you would have to be a millionaire to afford the stratospheric rents.  There was actually a newsstand on the Prominade years ago, I think it’s gone now.   Even Barnes and Noble had to close down.

There are similar book carts in London, but not as oool looking as the ones in France or Hungary. Anybody have any  other photos of book carts like this?  Email them to me so I can share.  unclepaulie@rocketmail.com.

Once Upon a Time in Mar Vista

Last Memories of Sam: Johnson’s Bookstore

PhotoStory by Paul Hunt

The Bookstore was once the Mar Vista Library. I found this flyer stapled to the side of a shelf.

This nice color photo of Bob Klein was stapled to a shelf. RIP

This bookmark was in one of the books I got at the sale.  The website is still active this June day but will soon disappear into the internet ethos.

Just before the final sale there were about 10,000 wondrous books snuggled into shelves.

 

 

The Dollar Sale – fabulous bargains to those in the know.

 

The shelves started getting sparce, but this was a store where there was not a bad book to be found. All relevant and clean, dust jackets were protected with plastic brodarts.

 

Then, as time ran out, all remaining books, about 5,000, were free.

 

Finally, all shelves were cleared, the last book went out with a happy customer.

And so ends the story of the last big bookstore on L.A.’s West Side.  All the books have found new homes with loving owners who are grateful and excited to get them.  Some folks returned to get some additional shelving.  Many thanks to Richard, Janet, Petee, and Julie for help with this story.  To Bob Klein and Larry Myers:  Salute.  You achieved much to educate and change the world for the better.

Goodbye Bookstore Friend.